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From owner-diesel-digest-outgoing@ns1.vrx.net  Tue Jul 24 11:58:08 2001
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To: diesel-digest@mbz.org
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Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 11:58:08 -0400 (EDT)


diesel             Tuesday, July 24 2001             Volume 03 : Number 812



Re: [DIESEL] Leaking Injector
Re: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123
Re: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123
RE: [DIESEL] continuation of 123/126 shelf life...
[DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval
Re: [DIESEL] continuation of 123/126 shelf life...
Re: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval
Re: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123
[DIESEL] Parts question
Re: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval
[DIESEL] 123 Suspension, contd.
RE: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval
Re: [DIESEL] continuation of 123/126 shelf life...
Re: [DIESEL] continuation of 123/126 shelf life...
Re: [DIESEL] 123 Suspension, contd.
RE: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval
RE: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123
[DIESEL] Now thats corny / was Just a brief note on the China Thread
RE: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval
RE: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123
[DIESEL] RE: Wheel bearing races install
RE: [DIESEL] Now thats corny / was Just a brief note on the China Thread
Re: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval
Re: [DIESEL] continuation of 123/126 shelf life...
RE: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123
Re: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 09:36:53 -0400
From: Marshall Booth <mbooth+@pitt.edu>
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] Leaking Injector

Tom, There is a VERY small chance that the #2 threaded ring
(that holds the prechamber in place) has cracked. This is
VERY rare, but just happened to a friend on another (R/E)
list. I've NEVER heard of it happening except during
installation or removal, but it obviously can happen. The
ring is inexpensive (a few dollars) but it requires a
special tool (either a splined tool for inclined injection
or a tool with two pins for vertical injection) and must be
torqued pretty firmly to 70Nm (inclined) or 90-110 Nm
(vertical).

Marshall 
- -- 
	  August M. Booth, Jr. Ph.D.
        Univ of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
       "der Dieseling Doktor" mbooth+@pitt.edu
'87 300TD 144Kmi,'87 190D 2.5 194Kmi, '84 190D 2.2 217Kmi,
'85 190D 2.0 149Kmi, '87 190D 2.5 turbo 200+kmi, '84 190D
2.2 234Kmi dismantled 
      Diesel Technical Advisor MBCA, member GWSection
    http://www.dhc.net/~pmhack/mercedes/mbooth1.htm




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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 10:47:26 -0400
From: Alan Kim <alankim@earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123

"Richard J. Sexton (Mechanic Role Account)" wrote:

>
> Where I live you really can't get around without 4x4 in the winter. For
> some reason Cherokee's hold up really well, better than Fords or
> Chevy's. I realise this goes against conventinal wisdom, but that's
> what I see here.

Sometimes there's a lot to be said for simplicity in design.
Cherokees (glorified trucks), inline-6/ 4 speed F-150, Ford Falcons, Dodge
Farts, a ratcheting screwdriver, etc.
Some would even mention the ol' 4-cylinder Volvo engines.





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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 10:42:47 EDT
From: MichaelS99@aol.com
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123

As an owner of a 235,000 mile W126, I believe it's safe to say these cars 
hold up far better than anyone would have expected. In this part of the 
country, where snow, sand and salt are a sure thing, there are quite a few 
Mercedes from the 1960s and early 1970s whose owners have not babied them but 
have taken care of maintenance, including body rust. It is not unusual to see 
150,000-mile 250SE's and 280SEL's in the town where I work, Greenwich.  I see 
no reason to believe that a 300SD, W126, would be more difficult to keep on 
the road, especially given the amazing longevity of the 5-cyl. engines. But 
keeping a car such as mine in good working order is not cost-free. Weighing 
the maintenance and bodywork costs against the purchase price of a new car is 
a constant equation. Of course, when a new M-B of similar dimensions is 
$50,000 or more, spending a bit on the old W126 becomes more attractive.

Perhaps the biggest issue in owning an older M-B involves finding a 
reputable, reasonable place to have maintenance work done. I have been BADLY 
burned by charletans who claimed to be Mercedes mechanics but merely buy 
auction cars, clean them and sell them to an ususpecting public. I am in the 
throes of two jobs that should have been done by these crooks: replacing the 
manifold gasket and doing front motor mounts.  The latter job I had paid to 
have done 3 years ago, but they only did ONE, failed to replace the shield on 
it and left the other, which is under the manifold to continue to soften and 
disintigrate.

I now do almost all of my own work. This is problematic because of the time 
it takes for someone like myself who is methodical and deliberate, in part 
because I am learning as I go. But as to the old W126 cars becoming "used 
up," I can only suggest that people like myself who believe in maintaining 
them as they were designed to be maintained will be able to drive them for 
many more years.

I was at the home of another M-B fanatic on Saturday. He has a very nice 
Ponton 190D that is a driver, not a show car. It is about 40 years old. Why 
shouldn't W126 cars be able to last as long with reasonable care and diligent 
maintenance?

Mike Sweeney
1981 300SD (235,000 miles)
Ridgefield, CT


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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 07:46:23 -0700
From: "Joe Knight" <jsknight101@home.com>
Subject: RE: [DIESEL] continuation of 123/126 shelf life...

SF Chronicle:
'83SD, mint,chrome wh., $6998
'80D, mint(seems to be the popular description), 1 owner, $3850
That all for todays classifieds

> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-diesel@mbz.org [mailto:owner-diesel@mbz.org]On Behalf Of
> Alan Kim
> Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2001 7:41 AM
> To: diesel@mbz.org
> Subject: [DIESEL] continuation of 123/126 shelf life...
> 
> 
> 
> 
> So.....all this bantering back and forth about the eventual demise of
> the remaining stock of 123/126 cars has got me wondering;
> 
> Would it be possible to get some feedback from different parts of the
> country what the asking prices are for, let's say, an 81 SD ?
> More interested in newspaper classifieds, not Internet listings.
> 
> Thanks for your help,
> 
> Alan



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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 10:46:17 -0400
From: "Lee Brown" <dbblmb@hotmail.com>
Subject: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval

   Last year I changed the power steering filter on our 300D vehicles.  I 
believe both had the original filter since it was a three piece assy, two 
steel plates and a pourous filter element.  I installed one piece paper 
filters manfd. by "Mann" of Germany.  What is the recommended interval for 
changing the power steering filters ?  Both the vehicle Maintenance Booklet 
for Passengers Cars with diesel engines and the    M-B  Maintenance Manual 
USA for passenger cars neglect to describe the proper service interval for 
changing the power steering filter.  I doubt if M-B would suggest leaving 
this filter in for the life of the vehicle.  I wonder why they did not 
specify the filter change service interval.

  L. M. Brown
  Gibsonia, PA

_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp



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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 10:54:12 -0400
From: Marshall Booth <mbooth+@pitt.edu>
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] continuation of 123/126 shelf life...

Alan, The price for an '81 300SD can be anywhere between
$1,000 and $10,000 and the cars can be WORTH about that too,
depending on their condition. These are 20 year old cars and
most have received average maintenance and are worth a bit
less then $5000, while some have been neglected and $1,000
is actually a bit overpriced. A very, very few have been
maintained as MB intended them to be maintained and have not
been subjected to serious environmental abuse and these few
cars could EASILY be worth $10,000. Most of the 300SDs
(model years between '81 and '85) in the DC area have asking
prices of between $2,500 and $7,500 with milage usually
between 175,000 and 300,000 miles. 

Marshall
- -- 
	  August M. Booth, Jr. Ph.D.
        Univ of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
       "der Dieseling Doktor" mbooth+@pitt.edu
'87 300TD 144Kmi,'87 190D 2.5 194Kmi, '84 190D 2.2 217Kmi,
'85 190D 2.0 149Kmi, '87 190D 2.5 turbo 200+kmi, '84 190D
2.2 234Kmi dismantled 
      Diesel Technical Advisor MBCA, member GWSection
    http://www.dhc.net/~pmhack/mercedes/mbooth1.htm


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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 10:58:49 -0400
From: Marshall Booth <mbooth+@pitt.edu>
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval

Lee, I see no need to change the filter any more often then
you'd change the steering fluid or the self leveling
suspension fluid/filter and I think the consensus is that
60-90kmi is a reasonable number for that. Most of mine have
gone MUCH longer with NO apparent detriment - at least not
yet.

Marshall
- -- 
	  August M. Booth, Jr. Ph.D.
        Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
       "der Dieseling Doktor" mbooth+@pitt.edu
'87 300TD 144Kmi,'87 190D 2.5 194Kmi, '84 190D 2.2 217Kmi,
'85 190D 2.0 149Kmi, '87 190D 2.5 turbo 200+kmi, '84 190D
2.2 234Kmi dismantled 
      Diesel Technical Advisor MBCA, member GWSection
    http://www.dhc.net/~pmhack/mercedes/mbooth1.htm


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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 11:15:54 -0400
From: Alan Kim <alankim@earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123

MichaelS99@aol.com wrote:

Perhaps the biggest issue in owning an older M-B involves finding a
reputable, reasonable place to have maintenance work done.

- ------------------------

100% agreed.
I am so fortunate to be willing to pay (when he says "Nah...forget about it.")
or occasionally drop off a bottle of Bordeaux and a hunk of Brie for our car
doctor.
If I quit getting my hands dirty, he gets all the credit.
Finally found someone who can more then offset the trouble of DIY repairs and
the headaches involved. And he appreciates owners who take an interest in the
workings of German cars and Volvos.
Having been "bubba" leery and avoiding them at all costs, it seems it has taken
nearly a lifetime to get to this point.
It's a great feeling to just drop off the car and walk away from it with
complete trust.




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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 08:19:02 -0700
From: "Joe Knight" <jsknight101@home.com>
Subject: [DIESEL] Parts question

Sorry for the rehash.  On the W123, do the radiator undershield and skid
plate serve any purpose other than protective(e.g., noise suppression)?



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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 11:22:57 -0400
From: Alan Kim <alankim@earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval

Marshall Booth wrote:

> Lee, I see no need to change the filter any more often then
> you'd change the steering fluid or the self leveling
> suspension fluid/filter and I think the consensus is that
> 60-90kmi is a reasonable number for that. Most of mine have
> gone MUCH longer with NO apparent detriment - at least not
> yet.

Earlier this year my steering pump failed at the shaft bearing, spewing
fluids all over the engine compartment. (Car had 200,000 miles) Had to
meticulously clean and hose down the compartment of all traces of the
stuff. I'm guessing the fluid was not changed and filter not maintained
for quite some time  after the dealer used to do it when the car was new
and the schedule book was being checked off. Anyway, now I have a
rebuilt pump and pulley assembly.
Until I came upon this group, steering and brake fluid change was
something I never thought about. Now I know better.




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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 11:22:29 -0400
From: Thomas Savage <thomas@savage.org>
Subject: [DIESEL] 123 Suspension, contd.

Firstly, thanks to all who have offered help both on- and off-list.

There's a front end specialty shop in town whom I'm interviewing
tomorrow afternoon.  Hopefully they'll know what they're doing at a
lower cost than the dealer.  

If not, does it make any sense for me to tackle the tie rods and idler
arms myself (they don't look that diffucult; someone please reassure
me), and leave the tough stuff that appears out of my league (ball
joints and control arm bushings) to the dealer?  Or is this a false
economy and it should all be done together?  

I'd like to get this done inexpensively and I like to do my own work. 
If I had a lot more time, I'd do it all myself, but I've only got a few
days after the BBQ when I won't need the car to be in daily service.

<sigh>

- -- 
__________________________________________________________________
Tom Savage | thomas@savage.org | Vienna, West Virginia | 1982 300D


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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 08:25:38 -0700
From: "Joe Knight" <jsknight101@home.com>
Subject: RE: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval

Just checked my Maintenance Manual.  Unless I missed something, the only
mention of the P/S is a level check.  I expect my filter's never been
changed--that's soon to be remedied.

> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-diesel@mbz.org [mailto:owner-diesel@mbz.org]On Behalf Of
> Alan Kim
> Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2001 8:23 AM
> To: diesel@mbz.org
> Subject: Re: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval



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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 11:32:08 -0400
From: Alan Kim <alankim@earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] continuation of 123/126 shelf life...

Marshall Booth wrote:

> Alan, The price for an '81 300SD can be anywhere between
> $1,000 and $10,000 and the cars can be WORTH about that too,
> depending on their condition. These are 20 year old cars and
> most have received average maintenance and are worth a bit
> less then $5000, while some have been neglected and $1,000
> is actually a bit overpriced. A very, very few have been
> maintained as MB intended them to be maintained and have not
> been subjected to serious environmental abuse and these few
> cars could EASILY be worth $10,000. Most of the 300SDs
> (model years between '81 and '85) in the DC area have asking
> prices of between $2,500 and $7,500 with milage usually
> between 175,000 and 300,000 miles.
>
> Marshall

Thanks.

I'm guessing around a firm $3,500 for mine.
Dash is still perfect. Interior is needing only detailing.
All mechanicals are in reliable working condition, with many
replacements.
Drives like a dream.
ACC was recently refurbished with 134 and works perfect.
However, I am really bothered by the rust that has developed around the
lips of both front fenders. About a 4" square patch on each side, so
they are isolated to only the fender areas. I have them stabilized with
POR-15.
Cruise control amp needs to be opened up and spot soldered here and
there.

I started this thread because I am under severe pressure from my wife to
unload one of the cars...

Alan





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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 11:35:50 -0400
From: Alan Kim <alankim@earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] continuation of 123/126 shelf life...

Joe Knight wrote:

> SF Chronicle:
> '83SD, mint,chrome wh., $6998
> '80D, mint(seems to be the popular description), 1 owner, $3850
> That all for todays classifieds

Thanks, Joe !

I will check many of the large newspaper web classifieds, which I think is
the same as the paper version Auto listings.

Take care,

Alan




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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 11:29:01 -0400
From: Dan Penoff <dpenoff@tampabay.rr.com>
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] 123 Suspension, contd.

At 11:22 AM 7/24/01 -0400, you wrote:
>If not, does it make any sense for me to tackle the tie rods and idler
>arms myself (they don't look that diffucult; someone please reassure
>me), and leave the tough stuff that appears out of my league (ball
>joints and control arm bushings) to the dealer?  Or is this a false
>economy and it should all be done together?

Tie rods are pretty easy, I would rate them as an easy to moderate DIY job. 
Buy the complete tie rods with ends as they're only a few bucks more than 
the ends by themselves. Buy a new steering damper (shock) as well. Cheap 
and will make a big difference in the way the steering feels. Replace the 
idler arm bushings, as these get wallered out over time and will contribute 
to the sloppy feeling you get as the parts wear and age. You can get the 
bushings, bolt and washers as a kit.

When you do the tie rods take the old ones off, lay them on a bench and 
measure the lengths carefully. Adjust the new tie rods to the same length 
before installing them so the front end geometry is close to where it was 
originally. That way the car will be drivable when you're done.

Leave the ball joints and suspension bushings to a professional. It will 
set you back some $$, but it's not a DIY job for most folks especially if 
you don't have the tools. The upper links have to be replaced which isn't 
hard, but the lower A-arm bushings require spring removal and a lot of 
beating or a press. Not something I would do, I would rather pay someone. 
And I have access to the tools, too. Sometimes it's better to leave this 
stuff to the pros.

Dan Penoff
"The Mercedes Martha Stewart"
1987 420SEL "Alberich the Nibelung"
1962 300SE (yet unnamed - Web site updated!) 
http://home.tampabay.rr.com/62300se/
Tampa, FL



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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 11:30:26 -0400
From: Dan Penoff <dpenoff@tampabay.rr.com>
Subject: RE: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval

At 08:25 AM 7/24/01 -0700, you wrote:
>Just checked my Maintenance Manual.  Unless I missed something, the only
>mention of the P/S is a level check.  I expect my filter's never been
>changed--that's soon to be remedied.

I think it ranks up with the filter on the hydraulic leveling system on the 
123 wagons. No intervals for these, either. In fact I've found dealer techs 
who don't even know they exist.


Dan Penoff
"The Mercedes Martha Stewart"
1987 420SEL "Alberich the Nibelung"
1962 300SE (yet unnamed - Web site updated!) 
http://home.tampabay.rr.com/62300se/
Tampa, FL



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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 11:31:03 -0400
From: "Joseph M. Gaffney" <jgaffney@brookcabinetry.com>
Subject: RE: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123

Thankfully, a friend of the family owns a repair shop.  He does
remarkable work, only drives MBs (including his wife and 2 daughters),
and loves it when he sees an older MB come in that is well-kept and
clean.  He is also the person I bought my 83 300D from, and it is no
wonder to me why it looks so good and runs so well after so many years.
Yet, despite the fact that he will do everything for free (I only pay
for parts, because I repair his computers all the time), I would still
like to become a more confident diesel DIY (which is quite different
than what I'm used to, being a Chevy DIY for quite some time now).

BTW, does anyone know where I could find a good manual (I don't care if
its paperback, on CD-ROM, whatever) that is pretty cheap?  I didn't get
a manual with the 300D, my friend did not have one for me when I bought
it.

Joseph M. Gaffney
jgaffney@brookcabinetry.com


- -----Original Message-----
From: owner-diesel@mbz.org [mailto:owner-diesel@mbz.org] On Behalf Of
Alan Kim
Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2001 11:16 AM
To: diesel@mbz.org
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123



MichaelS99@aol.com wrote:

Perhaps the biggest issue in owning an older M-B involves finding a
reputable, reasonable place to have maintenance work done.

- ------------------------

100% agreed.
I am so fortunate to be willing to pay (when he says "Nah...forget about
it.")
or occasionally drop off a bottle of Bordeaux and a hunk of Brie for our
car
doctor.
If I quit getting my hands dirty, he gets all the credit.
Finally found someone who can more then offset the trouble of DIY
repairs and
the headaches involved. And he appreciates owners who take an interest
in the
workings of German cars and Volvos.
Having been "bubba" leery and avoiding them at all costs, it seems it
has taken
nearly a lifetime to get to this point.
It's a great feeling to just drop off the car and walk away from it with
complete trust.




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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 08:34:36 -0700 (PDT)
From: Zach Gray <metadynamics@yahoo.com>
Subject: [DIESEL] Now thats corny / was Just a brief note on the China Thread

Little farms with little children riding little tractors
down rows of little corn plants...

Thats where all those reports of child labor come from!

  -Zach (who refuses to support the child labor/baby corn
industry in Communist China!)


- --- "Richard J. Sexton (Mechanic Role Account)"
<richard@mbz.org> wrote:
> >And where do those baby corns come from ?
> 
> I see it's time for "the talk".
> 


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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 08:29:17 -0700
From: "Markov, Greg" <GMarkov@TeachMaster.com>
Subject: RE: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval

Joe,

I use my Topsider to suck out all the PS fluid and replace it with clean ATF
every other time I change the oil.  It takes an extra minute, and makes me
feel good.  =)
Like Dan said, I don't think it's in the manual.

GM

- -----Original Message-----
From: Joe Knight [mailto:jsknight101@home.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2001 8:26 AM
To: diesel@mbz.org
Subject: RE: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval


Just checked my Maintenance Manual.  Unless I missed something, the only
mention of the P/S is a level check.  I expect my filter's never been
changed--that's soon to be remedied.

> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-diesel@mbz.org [mailto:owner-diesel@mbz.org]On Behalf Of
> Alan Kim
> Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2001 8:23 AM
> To: diesel@mbz.org
> Subject: Re: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval



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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 08:39:14 -0700
From: "Dahlgren, Jack" <jack.dahlgren@intel.com>
Subject: RE: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123

Mike,

I believe that you could make an '80's model 300D run just about forever.
Being a mechanical object, replacing parts or fabricating new ones is always
an option. I do not argue that point. However, as they migrate up to the
Cherokee graveyard in Canada they are more rapidly becoming scarce around
here. There will be a day when they are as unusual as the Ponton that you
wrote about. A car only owned by fanatics. In my part of the country which
just a few years ago was crawling with good examples of them, there is a
noticeable drop in the number of good ones for sale. 

Richard would claim that the eventual death of the majority of these cars is
just a hypothesis, but since Mercedes isn't making anymore of them, and they
do get smashed, wear out, rust etc. I think that it is a pretty sound
hypothesis. Kind of like saying we are all going to die someday. Sure, some
live longer and some get preserved and displayed under glass like former
Soviet rulers, but I think that the 123 is in late, late, middle age. My
point was that for the person looking for a daily driver, they won't be the
obvious choice they once were. That time is not now, but it is coming. I'll
send out an email when it happens.

As for 150K mile cars from the 60's, that works out to something between
3,700 and 5,000 miles per year. An '81 300D would have 75-100K miles on it
at that rate. How many of those are around? Here it IS unusual to see such a
thing. In California cars are driven year round and maybe things are farther
apart here, but your even your car has 235K miles ...


- -Jack

- -----Original Message-----
From: MichaelS99@aol.com [mailto:MichaelS99@aol.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2001 7:43 AM
To: richard@mbz.org; diesel@mbz.org
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123


As an owner of a 235,000 mile W126, I believe it's safe to say these cars 
hold up far better than anyone would have expected. In this part of the 
country, where snow, sand and salt are a sure thing, there are quite a few 
Mercedes from the 1960s and early 1970s whose owners have not babied them
but 
have taken care of maintenance, including body rust. It is not unusual to
see 
150,000-mile 250SE's and 280SEL's in the town where I work, Greenwich.  

<snip>

I was at the home of another M-B fanatic on Saturday. He has a very nice 
Ponton 190D that is a driver, not a show car. It is about 40 years old. Why 
shouldn't W126 cars be able to last as long with reasonable care and
diligent 
maintenance?

Mike Sweeney
1981 300SD (235,000 miles)
Ridgefield, CT


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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 11:39:28 -0400
From: "Jerry M. Keller" <jkeller@warwick.net>
Subject: [DIESEL] RE: Wheel bearing races install

Darrell writes:
   > Always  press  the  races  in  prior  to  assy.  You  would  have 
to  have
> a  long  lever  to  squeeze  the  races  in  with  the  split  nut  and  at
> that  they  probably  would  not  go.
> 
Jerry Keller writes:

Here is an email from George Murphy regarding the installation of
bearings and races. This technique works really well, I have used it myself.

George Murphy writes:

> 
> 
> WHEEL BEARING REPLACEMENT TIPS
> 
> Here's a few things to consider:
> 
> First, get the MB Chassis manual for your car so you can do the job right.
> 
> In my experience, the grease should be changed at the 90,000 mile service -
> I found my OEM grease was getting a little stiff by this mileage.
> 
> Use MB wheel bearing grease part no 001 989 23 51 10 or a good  grade of
> lithium high temperature bearing grease - Kendall Blue comes to mind. Of
> course, buy new inner hub seals.
> 
> Pull a bearing cap and look at the grease - if it is stiff and wax-like, it
> is long past time for bearing re-pack.  Anyway,  I do bearing grease at
> 90,000 miles interval (third 30,000 mile service) since MB now uses that
> new green high temp grease in all cars since 1986.
> 
> If your bearings are OK, but if the hubs are coming off anyway for rotor
> change, change bearing grease and install new seals.  Thoroughly clean the
> hub and bearings of ALL old grease.  DO NOT SPIN BEARINGS at high speed
> with air gun to dry them - be gentle with the air. Some mechanics like to
> have fun by making that high pitched whine  using compressed air to spin
> and dry out cleaned bearings - it is really hard on the bearings to do
> that.
> 
> Next, pack bearings by hand with MB grease - save all excess - weigh out
> correct # of grams and pack it into hub IAW the MB chassis manual. There's
> a reason for the specified grams of grease for the bearings and inside the
> hub. Too much leads to overheating and too little starves the bearings of
> grease. The  grams specified for inside  the hub and the bearings just
> fills the hub cavity such that centrifugal force during rotation forces the
> grease outward in both directions to continually pressurize the bearings
> and keep them lubricated. It has been shown that the grease actually
> "circulates" inside the hub and through the bearings to keep them
> lubricated - that's why properly-lubricated MB front wheel bearings can
> last so long, and that is the reason for that 45 grams of grease.
> 
> Use the rest of the grease  to fill the hub cap. In this manner the inside
> seal stops the grease from leaving the bearing due to centrifugal force,
> and the cap, being full of grease, keeps the grease inside the hub/bearing
> area.
> 
> The 150 gram tube of MB grease will do both front wheels - about 60 grams
> per hub plus 30 grams for bearings - simply follow the MB factory chassis
> manual procedure.
> 
> Here's data from TD Manual:
> 
> For a 150 gram tube of MB wheel bearing grease, here's how it breaks down:
> (From TDM Section 33)
> (All weights are approximate)
> 
> 107, 124, 201.03 models: total 65 to 70 grams - 50 in the hub with bearing;
> 15 to 20 in the hub cap
> 116, 123, 126: total 60 grams - 45 grams in the hub; 15 grams in the hub
> cap
> 201.02/1: total 50 grams- 35 grams in hub; 15 grams in the hub cap
> 
> Be sure to maintain the specified charge. Suitably weigh entire charge
> prior to starting assembly of front wheel hub. Weigh quantity filled into
> hub. Fill roller cage of tapered roller bearing well with grease. Also
> provide roller faces with grease. Fill hub cap approx to beaded rim.
> 
> Starting 12/88 all models use 150 gram tube - green grease part no. 001 989
> 23 51/10
> DO NOT MIX GREASE TYPES - unexpected results may occur.
> 
> As to setting the free play, certainly the dial gauge method is preferred.
> 
> Here's how I did it ON A 107 before I bought a dial gauge: (N/A for 126 and
> those w/o washer)
> 
> Re-assemble the washer and adjust nut and tighten it about 25 to 30 Nm
> while spinning the wheel.  Back off the adjust nut just enough so that you
> can barely rotate the washer behind it by hand - that should be as close as
> you can do it by feel. Tighten the lock bolt and check that the washer can
> still be rotated by hand - it should be a little stiff, by movable.
> 
> If you replace the bearings and races, you should repeat the above after a
> few hundred miles to assure that adjustment is correct. I've always had to 
> re-adjust after bearing race change, so plan on doing it anytime you
> replace bearings and races. . .
> 
> Hint: If changing bearings, put the new bearing races in the freezer . Put
> the hub in the oven at about 250F. Drive out the old races while the hub is
> hot. After a few hours in the freezer, the races will almost drop into the
> hub without a driver - but use a wood or plastic driver to assure proper
> seating of the bearing races.
> 
> 
> Regards,
> 
> George Murphy     MBCA Technical Director
> Smoky Mountain Section (TN)
> 
> Performance Analysis Company
> All MB parts plus
> Climate Control & Electronics
> 
> 1345 Oak Ridge Turnpike
> PMB 258
> Oak Ridge, TN  37830  MC/Visa
> USA
> 
> 865-482-9175
> 9 am to 5 pm ET voice or fax
> (george_murphy@compuserve.com)
> 
>


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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 08:46:19 -0700
From: "Dahlgren, Jack" <jack.dahlgren@intel.com>
Subject: RE: [DIESEL] Now thats corny / was Just a brief note on the China Thread

No Zach, it is not child corn, it is BABY corn! Precious baby corn! The
HORROR!
Someone please stop them!!!!

- -Jack 

- -----Original Message-----
From: Zach Gray [mailto:metadynamics@yahoo.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2001 8:35 AM
To: diesel@mbz.org
Subject: [DIESEL] Now thats corny / was Just a brief note on the China
Thread



Little farms with little children riding little tractors
down rows of little corn plants...

Thats where all those reports of child labor come from!

  -Zach (who refuses to support the child labor/baby corn
industry in Communist China!)


- --- "Richard J. Sexton (Mechanic Role Account)"
<richard@mbz.org> wrote:
> >And where do those baby corns come from ?
> 
> I see it's time for "the talk".
> 


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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 12:01:12 -0400
From: Alan Kim <alankim@earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] Power Steering Filter Change Interval

"Markov, Greg" wrote:

> I use my Topsider to suck out all the PS fluid and replace it with clean ATF
> every other time I change the oil.  It takes an extra minute, and makes me
> feel good.  =)

Great idea.
So it's more like a refreshment, not a complete change.
I guess you just top off to the mark ?
Another use for my Topsider, and thanks for that tip.




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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 11:57:59 -0400 (EDT)
From: "Richard J. Sexton (Mechanic Role Account)" <richard@mbz.org>
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] continuation of 123/126 shelf life...

>Would it be possible to get some feedback from different parts of the
>country what the asking prices are for, let's say, an 81 SD ?
>More interested in newspaper classifieds, not Internet listings.

Almost all newspapers classifieds are online these days. I havn't updated
this in about a year but here's some that at least worked at
some point :-)

http://www.mbz.org/commerce/forsale/newspapers/



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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 11:58:01 -0400 (EDT)
From: "Richard J. Sexton (Mechanic Role Account)" <richard@mbz.org>
Subject: RE: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123

At 07:40 AM 7/24/01 -0700, you wrote:
>So that't where they all went when they disappeared from around here...

Maybe. The guy, Ross Therian warned me about buying an Exploder
and had a 15 or 20 year old cherokee. Crude, all mechanical,
sound, ugly, no rust, original paint in damn good condition,
for $3500 CDN. But oh no, why would I listen to a guy that's
had 1000 cars in his life, we bought this stupid Exploder for 7K,
have sunk 3K into it so far and with another K or so I might be
able to sell if for 5. 

When I have sime time to kill I pull a chair up to it and
watch it rust.



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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 11:58:03 -0400 (EDT)
From: "Richard J. Sexton (Mechanic Role Account)" <richard@mbz.org>
Subject: Re: [DIESEL] 124 vs 123

>> Where I live you really can't get around without 4x4 in the winter. For
>> some reason Cherokee's hold up really well, better than Fords or
>> Chevy's. I realise this goes against conventinal wisdom, but that's
>> what I see here.
>
>Sometimes there's a lot to be said for simplicity in design.
>Cherokees (glorified trucks), inline-6/ 4 speed F-150, Ford Falcons, Dodge
>Farts, a ratcheting screwdriver, etc.
>Some would even mention the ol' 4-cylinder Volvo engines.

No kidding. I don't know of anybody around here that's ever been
let down by a mechanical Jeep 4x4, nor do I know anybody that
hasn't had problems with the Ford electronic 4x4. Of course
it only fails on the coldest of days - typically when you need
it it won't engage. When it won't disengage that's always a laugh
riot too. There's 3 major componesnts to it. I found the overhaul
instrucions vie the Exploder list and we did that to no avail, the
next step would be to replace those 3 components. Oh joy.



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------------------------------

End of diesel V3 #812
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